This level is for those who have tried to build a model ship before, or perhaps one of plastic. These models also have a simple construction, though you will meet a number of 'challenges' on the way!

               
BB472 Mary Ann
        
 
The Mary Ann is the first model produced by Billing Boats in 1958. It has been modified 4 times during the years and changed names 3 times. The ship is a typical 45-ton cutter commonly seen in the harbour at Esbjerg, Denmark; often more than 600 cutters of this type can be seen at a time. The model kit is based on the original ship drawings. 
   
 
BB472 Mary Ann
 
      Tool BB397  
 
 
BB474 Cux 87
 
The Cux 87 is a typical German trawler from the Deutsche Krabbenkutter Werft. This type of boat is often seen in the small harbours along the North German coast.
   
 
           
BB474 Cux 87  
      Tool BB397  
 
 
BB534 Boulogne Etaples
 
This original design can be seen in many ports along the French Channel. The boats are socalled stern trawlers, in which the net is pulled in using a tricing line in the rear of the boat. The hull is of steel; and the length is 11 m.
   
 
           
BB534 Boulogne Etaples
 
      Tool BB397  
 
 
BB570 White Star

 
A model of a typical American motor boat, used for tuna fishing in Florida in particular. A motor boat model with plastic hull, especially designed for model builders interested in an RC model
     
 
           
BB570 White Star
 
           
 
 
BB576 Bluenose

 
The schooner Bluenose has a very special place in the history of navigation and yachting. Built to fish off the Newfoundland coast, the ship soon turned out to be such a fast sailer that she won all the great classical regattas along the USA's Eastern coast. She was built in Nova Scotia in 1921, and shipwrecked near Haiti in 1946. A true copy - Bluneose II - was launched in 1964.
   
 
           
BB576 Bluenose
 
      Tool BB397  
 
 
BB580 Marie Jeanne
 
Built as the 19th Century was drawing to a close. This is a "dundee" of 50-60 tons and equipped with many sails, making necessary a ballast of 20-25 tons and a 12-man crew. Tuna fishing requires robust, seaworthy and relatively fast sailing vessels.
   
 
           
BB580 Marie Jeanne
 
      Tool BB397  
 
 
BB588 African Queen

 
This is the ship which gave its name to the movie starring Katherine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart. The story takes place during World War I. The African Queen attacks the German warship "Konigin Luise" on Lake Victoria in Africa, after a long and dangerous trip down the tributaries to the lake. The Billing Boats model has a plastic hull and imitation steam engine.
     
 
           
BB588 African Queen  
           
 
 
BB600 Bluenose II

 
The schooner Bluenose has a very special place in the history of navigation and yachting. Built to fish off the Newfoundland coast, the ship soon turned out to be such a fast sailer that she won all the great classical regattas along the USA's Eastern coast. She was built in Nova Scotia in 1929, and shipwrecked near Haiti in 1946. A true copy - Bluneose II - was launched in 1964.
       
 
           
BB600 Bluenose II  
           
 
 
BB605 St. Roch

 
The St. Roch was built at the Burrard Dry Dock in North Vancouver in 1928, intended for sailing in Arctic waters. It was the first ship to sail through the North-West Passage from the Pacific to the Atlantic. In the summer of 1944 the St. Roch sailed from Halifax to Vancouver, thereby becoming the first ship to complete the journey in both directions.
       
 
           
BB605 St. Roch  
           
 
 
BB608 Andrea Gail

 
The Andrea Gail, an un-inspected commercial fishing vessel departed Gloucester Harbour, Massachusetts, September 20, 1991 with six crewmembers on board. The crew intended to make a fishing trip for swordfish in the area of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, Canada. The vessel and six crewmembers remain missing and are presumed lost at sea in a major storm, referred to as the “Perfect Storm” by a meteorologist and made famous by Sebastian Junger’s book (the book was later turned into a Hollywood movie).
       
 
           
BB608 Andrea Gail  
           
 
 
BB609 America

 
1851 - Answering a challenge from the Royal Yacht Squadron, the schooner America enters the Hundred Guinea Cup race, a 53-mile race around the Isle of Wight. It easily defeats the 14 British ships and is awarded the Hundred Guinea Cup. On August 25, Queen Victoria herself visits the ship. America returns home and presents the New York Yacht Club with its prize, which is renamed America's Cup.  
       
 
           
BB609 America  
           
 
 
BB700 St. Canute

 
Built in 1931 at the Frederikshavn Shipyard in Denmark, St. Canute sailed for many years as a tugboat and icebreaker in the Odense harbour under its original name St. Knud. St. Canute is 28 m long, 7.6 m broad, draws 3.80 m.
     
 
           
BB700 St. Canute  
           
 
 
BB701 FD 10 Yawl

 
A typical Danish seiner, with a gross tonnage of 63.43 and built in 1929/1930 at the Nyborg Shipyard in Denmark. The ship was sold to the Faroe Islands in 1930 as the "Sjostjornan" TG II. After a period of 20 years with various owners and names, the ship was sold to Iceland in 1950, and was now called "Arnanes".
       
 
           
BB701 FD 10 Yawl  
           
 
 
BB703 Roar Ege

 
This Viking ship, dating from about 1000 A.D. was found in 1957 in the bay at Roskilde in Denmark. The wreck was salvaged in 1962, and after a thorough preservation it was possible to carry out a reconstruction of the vessel. Today the ship is on display at the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde.
       
 
           
BB703 Roar Ege
 
           
 
 
BB706 Sir Winston Churchill

 
Three Mastet Topsail Schooner 'SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL' The Schooner was built in 1965 at the Richard Dunston Ltd., Shipyard in Hessle, Yorkshire, GB, for the "Sail Training Association" in Bosham. The constructors of this ship were Chamber & Nicholsen Ltd. The 'Sir Winston Churchill' is also equiped with a 240 HP help-engine and has a total sailarea of 817 sqm.
       
 
           
BB706 Winston Churchill  
           
 
 
BB710 Phantom

 
A Classic American runabout from the mid-1920s. This type of boat was mainly used as racing boats, but in some cases also as tenders, for those who had a lager yacht. Racing boats from that time was build in beautiful classic materials such as teak and mahogany. If you had a 100-150 hp engine back then, you had one of the most powerful engines. The model is based on a fast 34 foot tender.
     
 
           
BB710 Phantom
 
           
   
           
 

- Beginners
- Advanced Beginners
- Experienced
- Experts

- Limited Releases
- Vintage Models
- Discontinued items
- Special Releases


- Fittings
- Wood
- Tolls, glue and paint
- Radio Control Equip.